The Jeffersonville Urban Enterprise Association & the City of Jeffersonville are happy to announce the completion of the Jeffersonville Tree Walk. A dream several years in the making, the Tree Walk is a 1.5-mile, recreational, walking route through the heart of Downtown Jeffersonville that celebrates the beauty, diversity, and natural benefits of trees.

Beginning and ending at Big Four Station, the walk leads you along the Ohio River, through historic residential neighborhoods and back to the heart of Downtown Jeffersonville. The trail is clearly marked with wayfinding signage at each corner and decals on the sidewalk indicate the common name of each tree. Signs also point out a possible shorter 3/4 mile loop.

The 140 trees you’ll find along the route represent over 70 species native to or suitable for Southern Indiana. Over the years, the trees will grow into a rich canopy that provides shade for pedestrian comfort, improves air quality, reduces stormwater runoff, and beautifies the neighborhood.

The plan for the Tree Walk, was originally conceived by the Jeffersonville Urban Enterprise Association in 2012. The plan recognized an ongoing need to maintain a living, breathing tree canopy in downtown and the desire to create a unique, educational and recreational experience for both residents and visitors.

A few trees were planted along the route in 2013, but the project remained dormant for a few years until 2016 when Jeffersonville Planning Director Nathan Pruitt and Long Range Planner Chad Reischl brought the plan back to life. Over the course of two years, planning staff, with the help of the City’s green team and local volunteers, planted over 110 new trees along the 1.5-mile walking route.

A grand opening celebration will be held at the base of the Big Four Bridge on Tuesday, August 28 at 10am.

More detailed information and a link to an interactive map can be found on the project’s website: cityofjeff.net/treewalk. The interactive map includes scientific names, varieties, and additional descriptions of the 140 trees as well as information on existing, older trees along the walk.

« »